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  1. How Comcast Censors Political Content
    Or Why My Comcast Horror Story Is Better Than Yours
    By David Swanson

    Most Comcast internet customers seem to have horror stories, but in my humble opinion this one is a doozie and may even suggest threats to freedom of speech more significant than the jailing of a court stenographer.

    I’m working on a campaign headquartered at http://www.afterdowningstreet.org that seeks to draw attention to the Downing Street Minutes and to lobby Congress to open an investigation into whether the President has committed impeachable offenses. According to a recent Zogby poll, 42 percent of Americans favor impeachment proceedings if the President lied about the reasons for war, and according to a recent ABC News / Washington Post poll, 52 percent think he did. But this story is nowhere to be found in the corporate media. So, our website attracts a lot of traffic.

    In addition, July 23rd is the three-year anniversary of the meeting on Downing Street that produced the now infamous minutes, and we are organizing events all over the country on that day. Or, we’re trying to. But we noticed about a week ago that everyone working on this campaign was having strange Email problems. Some people would get Emails and some wouldn’t, or they’d receive some but not others. Conference calls were worse than usual (I can’t stand the things anyway) because half the people wouldn’t get the info and know where to call in. Organizing by internet is super easy, but when you have to follow up every Email with a phone call to see if someone got it, it becomes super frustrating. Volunteers have been complaining all over the country – especially now that we’ve figured out what the problem was and they know what to complain about.

    We didn’t know it, but for the past week, anyone using Comcast has been unable to receive any Email with “www.afterdowningstreet.org” in the body of the Email. That has included every Email from me, since that was in my signature at the bottom of every Email I sent. And it included any Email linking people to any information about the upcoming events.

    From the flood this evening of Emails saying “Oh, so that’s why I haven’t heard anything from you guys lately,” it seems clear that we would have significantly more events organized by now for the 23rd if not for this block by Comcast.

    Disturbingly, Comcast did not notify us of this block. It took us a number of days to nail down Comcast as the cause of the problems, and then more days, working with Comcast’s abuse department to identify exactly what was going on. We’d reached that point by Thursday, but Comcast was slow to fix the problem.

    During the day on Friday we escalated our threats to flood Comcast’s executives with phone calls and cancellations, and we gave them deadlines. Friday evening, Comcast passed the buck to Symantec. Comcast said that Symantec’s Bright Mail filter was blocking the Emails, and that Symantec refused to lift the block, because they had supposedly received 46,000 complaints about Emails with our URL in them. Forty-six thousand! Of course, Symantec was working for Comcast, and Comcast could insist that they shape up, or drop them. But Comcast wasn’t interested in doing that.

    Could we see two or three, or even one, of those 46,000 complaints? No, and Comcast claimed that Symantec wouldn’t share them with Comcast either.

    By the time Comcast had passed the buck to the company that it was paying to filter its customers Emails, Brad Blog had posted an article about the situation and urged people to complain to Comcast.
    http://www.bradblog.com/archives/00001602.htm

    Brad quickly added Symantec phone numbers to the story on his website, and we called Symantec’s communications department, which fixed the problem in a matter of minutes.

    So, why does this matter?

    Comcast has a near monopoly on high-speed internet service in much of this country, including much of the Washington, D.C., area. Many members of the media and many people involved in politics rely on it. Three days ago, I almost decided to put a satellite dish on my roof. There’s no other way for me to get high-speed internet, unless I use Comcast.

    Comcast effectively censors discussion of particular political topics, and impedes the ability of people to associate with each other, with absolutely no compulsion to explain itself. There is no due process. A phrase or web address is tried and convicted in absentia and without the knowledge of those involved.

    Now, did Comcast do this because it opposes impeaching the President? I seriously doubt it. Apparently the folks at Symantec did this, and Comcast condoned it. But why?

    Well, we have no evidence to suggest that these 46,000 complaints actually exist, but we can be fairly certain that if they do, they were generated by someone politically opposed to our agenda. There’s simply no possible way that we’ve accidentally annoyed 46,000 random people with stray Emails and mistyped addresses. We’ve only been around for a month and a half, and we haven’t spammed anyone. In fact, during the course of trying to resolve the problem, Comcast assured us that they knew we hadn’t spammed anyone. And once we’d gotten Symantec’s attention, they didn’t hesitate to lift the block.

    But it had taken serious pressure to find out what the problem was and who to ask for a remedy. We only solved this because we could threaten a flood of negative attention.

    This state of affairs means that anyone who wants to stifle public and quasi-private discussion of a topic can quite easily do so by generating numerous spam complaints. The victims of the complaints will not be notified, made aware of the accusations against them, or provided an opportunity to defend themselves. And if the complaints prove bogus, there will be absolutely no penalty for having made them.

    And this won’t affect only small-time information sources. If the New York Times or CNN attempts to send people Email with a forbidden phrase, it won’t reach Comcast customers or customers of any ISP using the same or similar filtering program.

    And there is no public list posted anywhere of which phrases are not permitted. This is a Kafkan world. This is censorship as it affects a prisoner who sends out letters and does not know if they will reach the recipient or be destroyed.

    What if I had tried to Email someone about a serious health emergency during the past week, but they had been using Comcast and I had been including the address of my website in my Email signature? Is this not a safety issue?

    Above all, though, this is a First Amendment issue, as is well laid out in this excerpt of a statement released today by People-Link.org, the organization hosting the http://www.afterdowningstreet.org site:

    “This goes far beyond the normal anti-spam measures taken by major providers and represents an effective blocking of constitutionally protected expression and the fundamental right to organize and act politically on issues of concern.

    “Most spam blocking measures focus on the email address or the IP address of the suspected spammer. While there are anti-spam measures directed at the body of the email, these usually target attachments that could contain virus programs.

    “Targeting the inclusion of a website url can only have one outcome: that communications about that website and the issue it is presenting will be blocked from large numbers of people and that the communications from that site’s administrators and the campaign’s organizers will not reach their full constituency.

    “Whether Comcast’s intention or not, this is effectively political and unconstitutional.

    “It keeps people from getting valuable information about a campaign that is, in the opinion of many, critical to the future of this country’s political system.

    “It disrupts the organizing of this campaign and cripples the campaign’s ability to use its most effective communications tool: the Internet.

    “It damages people’s confidence in this campaign since many people who write the campaign can’t receive the response they expect and that the campaign has sent.

    “Perhaps the worst part of this development is that Comcast has been reportedly doing this without the knowledge of the managers of this website or anyone affiliated with this campaign. In fact, no Comcast customer has received any indication that email to him or her containing this url was blocked.”

    ____________________________

    DAVID SWANSON is a co-founder of After Downing Street, a writer and activist, and the Washington Director of Democrats.com. He is a board member of Progressive Democrats of America, and serves on the Executive Council of the Washington-Baltimore Newspaper Guild, TNG-CWA. He has worked as a newspaper reporter and as a communications director, with jobs including Press Secretary for Dennis Kucinich’s 2004 presidential campaign, Media Coordinator for the International Labor Communications Association, and three years as Communications Coordinator for ACORN, the Association of Community Organizations for Reform Now. Swanson obtained a Master’s degree in philosophy from the University of Virginia in 1997.

    LINK TO THIS ARTICLE
    http://www.afterdowningstreet.org/?q=node/794

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